Fall Harvest- Yeast Bread from Grape Pulp- Fried Green Tomatoes

This morning’s harvest- a quart of goat milk, eggs, bunch of green tomatoes, okra, pears, figs, spaghetti and butternut squash, herbs and autumn olives.  Do you see the pumpkins growing outside my window?

Fall is the busiest time on the Glasgow Farm. The harvest is plentiful but the laborers are few! We’ve got so many organic figs we don’t know what to do them all.  If you live close, you can pick some up! They’ll be coming in the whole month of September. You can freeze or can them for making Figgy pudding. Once you pick them, you’ve got to use them. They don’t have a long shelf life, like a couple of days.

We’ve also got pears a plenty. The branches are heavy but they aren’t completely ripe  yet. Another week, and if you live close you can come by and get some for making pear butter. One day I looked out my kitchen window and saw a squirrel, a rabbit and a groundhog all enjoying the pear tree at the same time.  Even with the wild eating them every day there’s still PLENTY. I wish they would have stayed still long enough for me to get my camera to show you!

More and more Milk Thistles continue to grow and are ready to be harvested–I just can’t get to them all!

My tomatoes didn’t do well- not hot enough this year and a LOT of rainy days. I’ve had plenty of green tomatoes.

Mostly green tomatoes all summer

Mostly green tomatoes all summer

Wash the tomatoes, slice, dip in beaten egg drench in flour both sides-sprinkle your favorite seasonings and salt on while frying

Wash the tomatoes, slice, dip in beaten egg drench in flour both sides-sprinkle your favorite seasonings and salt on while frying

I used gluten free flour you can use your favorite baking flour

I used gluten free flour you can use your favorite baking flour

 

Fry until brown on each side in butter-add more if it gets dry on the pan

Fry until brown on each side in butter-add more if it gets dry on the pan

 

I fried them on high and kinda forgot about them for a few min's-they were still delicious! Make a yummy sauce or dressing  to go on top. I use different dressings all the time. This time I made a topping out of curds, fresh herbs and pickled garlic. Served on top of organic greens and veg's

I fried them on high and kinda forgot about them for a few min’s-they were still delicious! Make a yummy sauce or dressing to go on top. I use different dressings all the time. This time I made a topping out of curds, fresh herbs and pickled garlic. Served on top of organic greens and veg’s

Spaghetti squash green beans below

Spaghetti squash hanging over fence with morning glories

Green beans line the inside of our barn yard

Green beans line the inside of our barn yard. Yep that’s the spaghetti squash you see on the fence. The squash is planted on the other side of the fenced in garden

 

Another wild fruit growing on the farm in the fall-Autumn Olives. They are the size of a currant and the taste- a cross between a currant and a tart cherry. VERY healthy to eat. God grew it them for us, we didn't plant them ourselves.

Another wild fruit growing on our farm in the fall-Autumn Olives. They are the size of a currant and the taste is a cross between a currant and a tart cherry. VERY healthy to eat. God grew them for us, we didn’t plant them. You can eat them raw,  cook them in jams, jellies, pies, sauces or make wine with them.

Growing right next to our Mulberry tree-The Autumn Olive bush

Growing right next to our Mulberry tree-The Autumn Olive bush

Grapes: Typically we get gallons and gallons of grapes from our vines but this year we didn’t get as much as usual. We didn’t take care of them the way we should have either. That makes a huge difference in the harvest. Two things I typically make with our grapes; new wine fermented with whey and yeast bread from the pulp. Here is a video of me preparing pulp to make yeast bread from pulp. 

Natural Yeast Bread

2 cups unwashed organic grapes, processed to pulp- the light powdery coating on the grapes is what is needed to make the yeast. Don’t wash off!!

11  cups ground organic flour (you can use wheat, spelt, rye or any combination-you can even use sprouted grain flours)

1 tablespoon sea salt

filtered water

Starter:

Place 2 cups grape pulp and 2 cups ground flour in clean bowl. Mix well and cover with cheesecloth secured with a large rubber band. Let sit. On day two add 1 cup flour and 1 cup filtered water. Mix well, cover and let sit in warm place. On day three, transfer to clean bowl and add 1 cup flour and 1 cup of filtered water. Cover and let sit in warm place until starter gets frothy and subsides. You should have around 5 cups. Use 4 cups to make bread and save one cup for future bread batches.

Natural Yeast Bread

7 cups flour

4 cups starter

1 tablespoon salt

1 1/2 cup filtered water

Mix well. Cover and let rise in warm place for at least 12 hours. Bake at 300 degrees for about 1 1/2 hours. Oh my goodness, this is delicious. I also use this same recipe for making gluten free yeast bread, I just use gluten free flours.

This is just two of the many loaves I made-the one on the left is gluten free, the one on the right is made from a organic sprouted wheat and spelt grains. The color will vary depending on what kind of flour you use

This is just two of the many loaves I made-the one on the left is gluten free, the one on the right is made from an organic sprouted wheat and spelt grains. The color will vary depending on what kind of flour you use.

Leave a comment below telling me what you wish you had growing on your property.  I’ll draw a winner from the batch next week and send a root, seed or tree from our farm. We’ve got Milk Thistle seeds, Fig root, Autumn Olive root, baby Mulberry tree, Lilac root, Sunflower seeds, Elderberry tree root. . .all organic of course. I’ll have to check and see if we have sprouting pear trees(baby).

Proverbs 28:19 “Those who work their land will have abundant food,
but those who chase fantasies will have their fill of poverty.”

Eating Your Weeds- Milk Thistle for Your Liver

Butterflies enjoying Milk Thistle next to barn

Butterflies enjoying Milk Thistle next to barn

Jonathan is doing well. Would you continue to pray? He needs our prayers. Thank you!! After walking the halls of  the hospital  and seeing all the sick people it makes you want to be healthy, doesn’t it! Hence, this post on Milk Thistle.

Milk Thistle is growing all over our property. For years I thought they were a pain and to some extent they are if you touch the thorns. They’re weeds that literally grow like wild here in VA.  Our cows and sheep wouldn’t eat them, nor our goats! Finally I did some research and found that God was saving them for us. The above ground parts and seeds are medicinal.

The seeds most often are used for liver and gallbladder disorders.

Some people use milk thistle for diabetes, diseases of the spleen, prostate, cancer, depression and, uterus. It is also used for allergy symptoms. They also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

In foods, milk thistle leaves (cooked)and flowers are eaten as a vegetable for salads and a substitute for spinach. The seeds can be used to make coffee substitute and tea.

I’m using my Milk Thistle seeds raw on salads, in our smoothies and in our oatmeal. Having a healthy liver is vital for our health. Here are just a few things the liver does:
*Controls the production and removal of cholesterol
*Makes clotting factors
*Produces immune factors such as gamma gobulin
*Creates bile to help digest food and absorb nutrients
*Helps to clear the body of waste, toxins, and drugs
*Helps to maintain blood pressure
*Helps to support the liver’s ability to regenerate damaged tissue
*Reduces inflammation of the liver and gallbladder
*Improves digestion by stimulating bile production
*Helps to detoxify the liver from poisons
*Provides the body with antioxidants
*Helps to treat cirrhosis of the liver, jaundice, and chronic hepatitis.

Milk Thistle is a super nutrient for liver health. For more info on Milk Thistle read these links:

http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/benefits-of-milk-thistle-seed/

http://naturallivingsocal.blogspot.com/2012/04/milk-thistle-seed-liver-regenerator.html

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/milk-thistle-benefits-and-side-effects

“Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and that you are not your own? For you have been bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body.” I Cor. 6:19-20

Chop the tops off the milk thistle plant-wear gloves

Chop the tops off the milk thistle plant-wear gloves

milk thistle 6

Let the tops dry for a week in a dry place

Pull the purple top out and you'll find this fluffy stuff with seeds on the ends

Pull the purple top out and you’ll find this fluffy stuff with seeds on the ends

I held the fluffy part and with one gentle tug the seeds came off easy. If you do a bunch you can shake the heads in a big bag and the seeds will drop to the bottom of the bag.

I held the fluffy part and with one gentle tug the seeds came off easy. If you do a bunch you can shake the heads in a big bag and the seeds will drop to the bottom of the bag.

We eat the seeds on our salad, in our smoothies and in our oatmeal

We eat the seeds on our salad, in our smoothies and in our oatmeal

 

milk thistle4

milk thistle 3

Elderberry Elixir- Flu and Virus Remedy

Elderberry Elixer

Elderberry elixir

Elderberry is prolific on the Glasgow Farm. Our honey bees were in bee heaven early this summer with all the  Elderberry blossoms. Elderberry is famous for it’s ability to treat flu and virus symptoms.  This was my first year to make my very own Elderberry elixir. For years I had read how Elderberry  trumps Tamilfu for flu and virus remedy ability, so I decided to make a batch! It is so like God to put the very remedies we need in close proximity to us.

1 Corinthians 6:19-20
“Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and that you are not your own? For you have been bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body.”

Elderberry Elixir Recipe
Two pint canning jar (or other glass jar that seals well)
Two cups washed ripe elderberries (it took an hour to pick the ripe one’s from the unripe!)
Two cups of high quality brandy
One cup of raw honey
Pour all ingredients into mixing bowl together and stir well. Pour into sterilized pint-sized jars. Secure top on and shake carefully. Let sit in cool dark place for four to six weeks. Strain well, reserving liquid and store in airtight jar in cool, dark place. You don’t have to strain if you don’t want. Shake  before using. Store in small tincture bottles if you have any. The elderberry tincture (elixir) will last a year or more. This is the first year I have made it! The remedy goes back to Hippocrates.

Take a teaspoon every three hours at onset of flu or virus. You can put a teaspoon into a cup of water and drink as well.  Take until well! If you’ve come into contact with someone with the flu or virus I suggest to take 3 or 4 times a day.
Of course- rest and eat chicken soup along with your Elderberry elixir!

“Elderberries have been a folk remedy for centuries. Elderberry is used for its antioxidant activity, to lower cholesterol, to improve vision, to boost the immune system, to improve heart health and for coughs, colds, flu, bacterial and viral infections and tonsilitis. Bioflavonoids and other proteins in the juice destroy the ability of cold and flu viruses to infect a cell. People with the flu who took elderberry juice reported less severe symptoms and felt better much faster than those who did not. Elderberry juice was used to treat a flu epidemic in Panama in 1951.”

Make sure you don’t eat unripe elderberries, the stem or leaves. They can make you very sick.

A Elderberry bunch- the unripe ones and the stems are dangerous to eat. Only use the ripe berries, the black ones

An Elderberry bunch- the unripe ones and the stems are dangerous to eat. Only use the ripe berries, the black ones

Unripe elderberries, in addition to the plant’s leaves, twigs, stems and roots, contain traces of cyanide- So be careful!

Elderberry Elixier ingredients: Raw honey, good quality brandy and Elderberries

Elderberry elixir ingredients: Raw honey, good quality brandy and ripe Elderberries

Pour all ingredients into mixing bowl

Pour all ingredients into mixing bowl

 

Stir elderberries, brandy and honey

Stir elderberries, brandy and honey together

Pour into pint sized jars-this recipe fit into 2 pint jars

Pour into clean pint-sized jars-this recipe fit into 2 pint jars

 

Elderberry Elixier

Elderberry elixir

 

Elderberry_hay_baler_field_DG_Hartwood_VA_8813 (17)

Elderberry elixir Secure top on and let sit for 4-6 weeks. You can strain out the berries at that point or let them stay and get stronger.

Elderberry_Hartwood_VA_DG_8313 (2)

 

You can order  Elderberry bushes from  Gurneys.com.

 

Elderberry tree/bush grew up  through our baler

Elderberry tree/bush grew up through our Baler they would take over our field if we let them!

 

Elderberry bush hanging over bunny

Elderberry bush hanging over bunny

Mulberry Harvesting-10 Ideas of What to do With Mulberries

 

We have five Mulberry trees on the farm.

We have five Mulberry trees on the farm.

Who doesn’t love-making memories or recounting old ones? This past weekend 200 people came to our farm to enjoy family and friends. Dale and I had harvested mulberries the day they got here. Buckets and buckets  were waiting to be processed in my kitchen. My first thought was, I need to get this cleared out of here before all our company comes. But then they arrived before I could get to them and the mulberries became the focus of the night.

 

Many older people who strolled through the kitchen  mentioned the memories of seeing piles of harvest in their grandparents kitchens when they were growing up. They would bring the younger people aside and tell tales of their families mulberry picking and how incredulous it was! Even people who had no memories of mulberries were mesmerized by the mountains of produce in our kitchen. It must be something innate in mankind to feel the pleasure of a bountiful harvest.  I processed the mulberries that night and many who came through said they would never forget the wonderful memory made in our kitchen.

Mulberries are rather mild in flavor, but chock full of nutrients. God planted our Mulberry trees Himself, He knew we would need them. I’ve put up three bushels so far and we’ve only harvested for 2 days! That’s almost 30 gallons! Thank You Lord, You are our Provider!

Ideas for Mulberries:

1. Make a mulberry pie. Find your favorite blackberry pie recipe and substitute mulberries for the blackberries. Just remember–they’re not as sweet.

2. Make a mulberry cobbler. 1 cup of baking flour (I use Pamela’s baking mix it’s gluten free. You can use self rising flour), 1 cup organic sugar, 3/4 cup milk (I use raw), 2 teaspoons vanilla and 1 stick of butter. Melt butter in bottom of baking dish. Mix flour, sugar, milk and vanilla together then spread on top of melted butter. Mix 2 cups of mulberries in 1/3 cup of sugar- heat to melt sugar.  Pour on top of flour mixture in baking dish. Bake for 35-40 minutes in 375 oven–or until done (won’t wiggle when you shake it). Serve with homemade ice cream! Eat on front porch with family and friends. This is truly delicious!

Mulberry Cobbler

Mulberry Cobbler- I ran out of organic sugar so I used 1/2 organic brown sugar in this cobbler- hence the darker color

3. Make mulberry pancakes. Use my pancake recipe, add mulberries to the mix and top with whipped cream and berries on top.

4. Make mulberry smoothie. 1 cup of yogurt, 1/3 cup crushed or juiced mulberries, 1 tablespoon coconut oil, 1 tsps. raw honey and 1/2 tsps. organic vanilla- you can add nuts or flax seeds if you eat with a spoon.

5. Make oatmeal with mulberries. After my oatmeal is ready I add butter, honey, raw milk and a handful of frozen mulberries to the top. YUM!

6. Make mulberry granola.  4 cups walnuts, ½  teaspoon celtic sea salt, ½ cup water, 4  dates pitted and chopped, 5 dried apricots  chopped, ½ cup dried mulberries, 1 teaspoon cinnamon

7. Make your favorite salad and pour fresh or dehydrated mulberries on top.

Dehydrating mulberries in dehydrator

Dehydrating mulberries in dehydrator

8. Make homemade mulberry ice cream. I use 4 cups of raw milk, 1 cup organic sugar, 5 organic and free range egg yolks and 2 tsps. vanilla. Mix all and let sit in fridge for an hour or so. Pour into ice cream maker–use your directions for how long to process. Mine takes 25 minutes. In the last five minutes I add 1/2 cup of crushed mulberries. When I serve the ice cream I add more berries to top!

9. Eat by themselves!

10. Make mulberry muffins. Use your favorite recipe and substitute mulberries for any fruit called for in recipe.

Make sure you don’t use the unripe ones, unless of course you’re in need of a laxative! After you harvest mulberries they deteriorate quickly. They’ll stay good for a couple of days, they keep longer in the fridge.

“Mulberries are very high in antioxidants, which help the body cleanse damaged cells which lead to many complications. They also contain large amounts of vitamin C as well as Vitamin K, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, really high levels of Iron, and Dietary Fiber which all help to give the body and mind incredible energy to live happy and healthy lives! They are also high in minerals like potassium, manganese, and magnesium and contain the B vitamins, B6, Niacin, Riboflavin, and Folic Acid.

Mulberries contain flavinoids and phyto-nutrients and are extremely high in anthocyanins which help to fight against cancer as well as reduce aging and neurological diseases, inflammation, diabetes, and bacterial infections. The berries also contain resveratrol, a powerful blood flow increasing antioxidant which you have probably heard promoted through the wine industry as their new claim to fame. Resveratrol is a powerful healer for many conditions such as aging diseases, inflammation, and a number one go to as part of an herbal protocol for the treatment of lymes disease.” Nutrition facts from www.ReturntoNature.us.

The Mulberry tree is directly behind everyone

The Mulberry tree is directly behind everyone

Dale harvested 30 gallons of mulberries  in two days! 4 hours of labor. There's a ton left to harvest!

Dale harvested 30 gallons of mulberries in two days! 4 hours of labor. There’s a ton left to harvest! He puts a sheet on the ground below the branches and then shakes the branches. The ripe ones gently fall onto the sheet. Easier than picking blackberries amongst thorns and poison ivy!

Mulberries make a great all natural dye for clothes!

Mulberries make a great all natural dye for clothes and fingernails!

Mulberry smoothie! Homemade plain yogurt, raw honey, mulberries and a little  organic vanilla-YUM!

Mulberry smoothie! Homemade plain yogurt, raw honey, mulberries and a little organic vanilla-YUM! We eat them on our salads too! Dehydrate, freeze or can the berries for preservation!

Making memories

And He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into His harvest. Luke 10:2

Every time we have a bountiful harvest, I think of that verse and it convicts me to bring in God’s harvest!  People are ripe for hearing the Good News of Jesus, we just need to do it!

 

Storage of Winter Vegetables

Storing Vegetables in my Root Cellar

I love the fact that vegetables can keep the entire winter in a root cellar. That is, if they are taken care of properly. Now, just to let you know, I didn’t grow all of these vegetables. We have grown all of them at one time or another on our farm. Our problem the last two years has been our stinking ground hogs.

They love to eat the garden.  They especially love things with blossoms, like pumpkins.

Sparky and  the garden eater, a ground hog

Pumpkins, guards, spaghetti, and butternut squash are the winners in keeping a winter storage.  Our cellar stays nearly 50 degrees- from fall until early spring. The pumpkins and butternut squash have potential to be as perfect as when picked, if the temperature stays 50 and under. The secret is, don’t let them touch each other! They need air circulation.

Carrots store well in sawdust (non-chemical of course). Dale has enough sawdust from all of his wood working to keep me stocked.  I pulled the carrots out of the sawdust so you can see them.

Sweet potatoes do fairly well in our cellar. If picked in September, they’ll store well until February. Most all the vegetables must not be washed before they are stored. They are cured after being pulled from the garden for a few days. Cured is another word for drying them out. You don’t want any moisture on them when stored or they’ll rot.

I go through onions pretty fast. I wouldn’t know from experience how long they last. Most people braid and hang them.

I also dry beans from green beans. Ours seem to grow even when I don’t water them. They grow supernaturally, you pick them, and within just a few days the plants are loaded again!  So, to get white beans- let your last crop mature on the vine.  Don’t pick.  After they’re mature pull the plant up and hang upside down on the fence.  Let dry for a couple of weeks (they can’t be in rain so you may want to bring into barn to hang).  After completely dry, bang the plant inside a can or barrel and the beans will easily fall out of the shell. Or you can open them by hand.  They must be dry and have no moisture before you store them.  Store in a cool, dry area.  Unopened they store for 30+ years.  Opened, they last a couple of years. Oh, yes and ground hogs and rabbits don’t eat our beans.  :)

Kale (photo below) planted in the fall will grow until January, here in Virginia.  This year, mine is still growing and it’s February- even though our night time temperatures have been in the teens. Kale is a great winter vegetable. Even if it hibernates January through February, it awakens the first of March with tons of nutrients for your family to eat.

My thyme and rosemary are still going strong on my porch. The porch is not heated, but it is enclosed. The temperatures go below 32– but the plants are still doing well. I water them once a week and they have sun exposure.

I made Smoked Saffron Chicken and White Beans/Portugal Style  gluten-free with some of the beans and herbs. It was delicious!

Storage of winter vegetables do well in the corner of a garage on shelves. Just put covering over them for insulation. Or, if you want to be adventurous  dig yourself a hole in the ground, put the vegetables inside and cover with hay or other insulated materials.

Help yourself to fresh vegetables all winter long!

In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil, but a foolish man devours all he has. Proverbs 21:20

Pumpkin, butternut squash, kale(fresh out of garden), herbs(from porch) eggs(from our coop), pumpkin seeds , curds and northern beans (white beans)– They’re all on the menu for this week!

 

The Weekend Harvest–Bushels of Pears/ Pear Cider

Harvesting our pears

This past weekend Dale installed a 30 ft mural that he created for the county. I’ll show you what it looks like after the unveiling this afternoon, exciting.

Saturday pears were dropping from our pear tree faster than fast, that meant harvest time. I picked as many as I had room to store. I’m going to make pear butter (the best ever) with them, but I’m waiting for Rachael to come home and video the process so you can be with us.

I use cider in my pear butter so I started a couple of batches.

After pear harvesting I mowed the yard for a few hours, planted pansies on the front path to the house, then made dinner and dessert to bring Dale and his crew at the county installation. I stayed with them until midnight so I could help hang the 30 foot header on top of the mural.

Sunday Dale had a few loose ends to finish on the installation, then came home and we enjoyed a pot roast, potatoes and vegetables. We then enjoyed a long walk around the property and found at least 50 persimmon trees growing in the back field. This is the first year we’ve noticed them having fruit. They were delicious! Yum!

We’ll be a persimmon orchard in a couple of years. We found another pear tree that’s limbs were drooping with fruit. God has been good to give us so many delicacies.

We then sat down next to the barn and pondered all the things God has laid on our heart for the future, it was a sweet time.

 

This was the pear tree a week before. You can see the ones picked are more yellow and ready for use immediately.

Harvested pears

I stored as many as I could in our old refrigerator and in the house . These will be used for the pear butter.

 

This is our antique apple press for making cider. I love it! However,I didn’t have time to clean it, I opted for the electric juicer in my kitchen.

I washed the pears, took out bad places, chopped them and then sent them through the juicer

Chopped pears

Pear cider in waiting. Buying cider at the store would be easier, but when you have an abundance of fruit you gotta make it yourself. I added homemade whey to this for fermentation and to add good bacteria.

Pulp from the pear juice

Chickens and rooster enjoying the pulp

 

Edward, our buck eating the pear scraps

After harvesting pears and mowing for a couple of hours I planted pansies. These will be triple in size next spring, just in time for the big wedding.

One of our many persimmon trees

 

Walking, talking and dreaming of all the Lord has laid on our hearts